Fun Facts About Candy Corn

Candy CornLove it or hate it, Halloween would not be quite the same without candy corn. It’s been around as long as we can remember — but the confection we’re so used to seeing this time of year just becomes part of the Halloween decorations. But it has a few interesting details you may not be familiar with. Here are some fun facts about candy corn — the fall candy Americans fell in love with more than a century ago.

Chicken Feed Little has changed about candy corn since it was first manufactured in the 1880s except for the name. Candy corn was originally called “Chicken Feed” and the packaging featured a rooster as part of the logo. It originally had a very strong following among farmers.

Wedding Cake One of the ingredients that gives candy corn it’s unusual hard-yet-soft texture is fondant. Fondant is sugar and water heated together just long enough for it to be moldable. Fondant is used as icing on elaborate wedding cakes because you can sculpt it and make beautiful, ornamental cakes you can’t make with regular icing.

Candy CornSpecial Recipe Though Brach’s wasn’t the company to introduce candy corn to America, they’ve been making it for a long time with their own recipe – and that recipe includes honey. Most other candy corn is made with plain corn syrup.

Not for Vegans Even if you opt for the makers who don’t use honey (honey is not a vegan product), it still wouldn’t be a vegan treat because one of the ingredients in candy corn is marshmallow which contains gelatin. Gelatin is made from animal protein. More specifically, gelatin is made from collagen which comes from bones and joints of animals. It’s an ingredient in many of the things we eat but it’s a no-no for a vegan diet.

Shellac Shine Candy corn allegedly contains shellac – it’s what makes fingernail polish shiny. Shellac is a resin secreted from a lac bug found in India and Thailand. It’s used in all sorts of products and candies to give them a sheen – but it’s another reason candy corn isn’t considered vegan.

candy pumpkinPurple Corn You’re probably familiar with the slight variations in shapes and colors — pumpkins for Halloween or bunnies for Easter — but in eastern Canada, they produce a purple candy corn. The flavor is blackberry cobbler.

Of course, if you really love candy corn, you don’t have to wait until October every year to have it – you can eat it year-round if you make it. The Food Network’s Alton Brown has his own recipe for the fall favorite. Otherwise, there is plenty of candy corn coming at you in the next few weeks!

 

Lakeside Selection: Our Choice of Favorite Items of the Week

As the week winds down, we are looking forward to relaxing a little at home. After several nights of quick meals, it is time to work in the kitchen to create something special. If cooking is not your thing, keep snacks close at hand on the counter and in the living room so you can grab something sweet in a hurry. Remember, everyone loves something gourmet to nibble on, even your pet! Here is the Lakeside Selection: Our Choice of Favorite Items of the Week.

The varied sizes of the Set of 4 Lasagna Baking Pans are perfect for any event from a large dinner with guests to a cozy meal for two.

The varied sizes of the Set of 4 Lasagna Baking Pans are perfect for any event from a large dinner with guests to a cozy meal for two.

Jolly Chef Kitchen Collection is a fun and upbeat way to give your home color.

Jolly Chef Kitchen Collection is a fun and upbeat way to give your home color.

Make brand name candy bars that are just as delicious as the real thing with this Copy Cat Candy Bars Cookbook.

Make brand name candy bars that are just as delicious as the real thing with this Copy Cat Candy Bars Cookbook.

3-Way Candy Dispenser keeps your favorite snacks close and easily accessible.

3-Way Candy Dispenser keeps your favorite snacks close and easily accessible.

Your pet deserves to dine in style, and this Pet Food Cabinet with Bowls lets him do that without costing you a fortune.

Your pet deserves to dine in style, and this Pet Food Cabinet with Bowls lets him do that without costing you a fortune.

 

 

 

 

 

Lollipop Day: The History of the Lollipop

LollipopJuly 20th is National Lollipop Day. The lollipop has a long history — some evidence the idea of candy on a stick has been around for centuries, but surprisingly, the modern lollipop in the United States has only been around for a little over 100 years. Here’s a little bit of the history of the lollipop.

The word originated in Northern England in the 18th century, but their lollipops were a bit different from what we now know as lollipops. At the time, soft candy was referred as Lolly Pops – in that dialect it literally translates as “tongue” (lolly) “slap” (pop), but the term didn’t surface in the United States until the turn of the century.

Lollipop1908 was a big year for candy on a stick. In Racine, Wisconsin, at McAviney Candy Company, hard candy was the focus. Workers used wooden sticks to stir the candy and there was always a bit leftover on the stick – which employees gave to their kids. Seeing the potential for the product, the company started mass-producing candy on a stick.

According to connecticuthistory.org, the Bradley Smith Company started producing candy on a stick in 1908 as well, but the owner of the company, George Smith, gets the credit for the name “lollipop.” He claimed the name for a trademark after being inspired by a race horse called Lolly Pop, but because of the original use of the term by the English, the trademark office refused his request. It wasn’t until the 1930s Smith finally got Lolly Pop” trademarked, however, the term is now part of public domain.

LollipopThe word and the candy live on in different forms and under different names around the world. On June 20th, we can all enjoy a tasty piece of history. Happy Lollipop Day!